Calgary, CAN: Rules in Works for Booming Food Truck Industry

Under new rules being developed by the city, Calgary food trucks may soon gain access to parks and be assigned designated parking spots. Photograph by: Calgary Herald/Files , Calgary Herald

By Sherri Zickefoose  |  Calgary Herald

Under new rules being developed by the city, Calgary food trucks may soon gain access to parks and be assigned designated parking spots. Photograph by: Calgary Herald/Files , Calgary Herald
Under new rules being developed by the city, Calgary food trucks may soon gain access to parks and be assigned designated parking spots.
Photograph by: Calgary Herald/Files , Calgary Herald

Calgary’s booming food truck scene may see some changes, including reserved parking spots and a rethink of how close trucks can set up near restaurants and parks.

The city is seeking public and industry input as its food truck pilot project is closer to hatching a bylaw that will govern the full-service food-truck industry.

After polling other cities and looking at its own research, the city is planning on introducing trucks to parks this summer, and considering designated parking spots.

“We are seeking a broader audience input on the proposed bylaw,” said Kent Pallister, the city’s chief licence inspector.

“This bylaw will provide the rules that need to be followed and will allow new business operators to enter the market.”

Currently, food trucks must set up at least 25 metres from restaurants when they are open for business, unless they have written permission, and there are certain “no roll” zones throughout business revitalization zones aimed at reducing unfair competition. Only two trucks can be parked at a time, unless they are part of an event. They must also be parked at least 100 metres from schools and parks.

Now, the city is seeking public input on whether the 25-metre rule is reasonable, and whether reserved spots specially designated for food trucks should be allowed.

“Reserved spots were not within the scope of the original pilot, but have been highlighted as part of its findings and research from other cities as a means to accomplish the goal of adding vitality to a community,” the city’s online survey reads. The proposed bylaw information is available online at calgary.ca/foodtrucks.

An open house is planned June 5 from 3 to 7 p.m. in the Telus Convention Centre.

City administrators are aiming to present draft legislation to the city’s planning and urban development committee July 17.

The city launched the food truck pilot program in August 2011.

The city has capped full-service food trucks at 43 during the pilot phase, but is not seeking to limit licenses.

http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/Rules+works+booming+food+truck+industry/8458166/story.html