Lewiston , ID :MPC approve food truck venue by a narrow margin

By Taylor Cooper  |  The Brunswick News

By Taylor Cooper  |  The Brunswick News

 

 

 

A site plan for a proposed food truck yard narrowly passed a vote by the Glynn County Mainland Planning Commission on Tuesday.

The owners of a parcel that once housed the Pumpkin Patch — formerly a fresh fruit and vegetable market at the corner of U.S. Highway 341 and Ga. Highway 303 — are looking to open a food truck yard called Boomers Brews, Grub and Tunes, styled after an

establishment in Dallas, Tex.

“It was communicated in various meetings the applicant is basing their business concept on this site on the Truck Yard in Dallas, Tex.,” said Maurice Postal, a county planner. “The concept is an outdoor food truck yard, beer garden and live entertainment venue, and restaurants are an allowed use in the highway commercial zoning.”

A site plan attached to the planning and zoning staff report on the project details expanded parking at the front and back of the property and the proposed layout of the yard in back, which would be covered in a layer of gravel.

The site plan also shows two spaces for food trucks, a bar, two outdoor seating areas and an outdoor stage and dance floor. It also includes an area for guests to walk their dogs.

The old Pumpkin Patch building will remain to serve as the entrance into the back yard and as part of the establishment’s bar.

Part-owner Tony Clark clarified the restaurant’s design. While the site plan showed the bar in a detached structure, he said the bar would actually start in the existing Pumpkin Patch building and spill over into a repurposed shipping container connected via a porch.

While food trucks will be the primary source of food, Clark said the bar will also serve food from its own menu.

Sharon Clark, the other owner, said the hours of operation would be 5 to 11 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

MPC member Gary Nevill asked about the noise level neighbors could expect from the business.

The music will be low-key, Sharon Clark said, not loud enough to cause a disturbance. She and Tony Clark envisioned it as a family-friendly place where people could relax and converse.

While it usually doesn’t allow public comment on site plans, the MPC voted unanimously to hold public hearings on all site plans on the agenda Tuesday.

Donald Hutcheson, a nearby resident, said he was concerned the business would worsen congestion in the area and with the establishment’s proximity to Remnant Church and to Christian Renewal Church.

“I know the folks have offered some legal reasons that they can build next to a church,” Hutcheson said. “I don’t like those legal reasons, I don’t think this venue should be right next door to a church where the property lines meet, particularly now that they say it’s going to operate on Sunday mornings.”

In addition, the food truck yard’s hours of operation will overlap with youth sports games hosted at Christian Renewal, he said, which should be a concern for the county.

Hutcheson added that around 15 other residents who lived nearby were opposed but did not attend the meeting because they did not think they would be able to speak.

Jamie Jackson, the pastor of Remnant Church, said the establishment’s hours of operation would run concurrently with their morning and evening services and youth programs.

“If there’s drinking involved, there’s probably intoxication involved, which doesn’t seem to really mix with small children less than 50 yards away,” Jackson said.

Tony Clark said he was raised as a Pentecostal Christian, so the idea of selling alcohol so close to a church didn’t sit well with him.

That said, most locally-owned restaurants in the county offer alcohol to some degree, he said, including the family-friendly ones.

Postal addressed the business’s proximity to the church.

“County ordinance does generally enforce a 600-foot buffer between retail establishments selling alcohol and a church,” Postal said. “But (county ordinance) section 2-3-16(g) waives that 600-foot buffer if the property where the church is located was in a commercial or industrial zone when members of the church began worshiping and if that property is still in a commercial or industrial zoning district at the time an application is filed for an alcohol license.”

While Remnant Church is located within the buffer, it has occupied a highway commercial zone since it opened, Postal said, meaning the 600-foot buffer requirement does not apply.

As for traffic, Chris Amos, agent for the owners, said the two exits sit right next to a traffic light. If traffic from the business does back up, it will back up into the parking lot and will not spill onto the street.

“That light will regulate it,” Amos said.

The MPC ultimately approved the site plan 4-3, commissioners Gene Lee, Richard Strickland and John Williams voting against it.

In other business, the commission voted to:

• Recommend the county commission approve an ordinance amendment dealing with the planning commissions’ officer election process.

• Recommend the county commission approve an amendment to the planning commissions’ bylaws.

• Approve a 1,500 square foot vehicle storage building on Bailey Road.

The MPC’s next meeting is scheduled for Aug. 6.

 

 

A site plan for a proposed food truck yard narrowly passed a vote by the Glynn County Mainland Planning Commission on Tuesday.

The owners of a parcel that once housed the Pumpkin Patch — formerly a fresh fruit and vegetable market at the corner of U.S. Highway 341 and Ga. Highway 303 — are looking to open a food truck yard called Boomers Brews, Grub and Tunes, styled after an

establishment in Dallas, Tex.

“It was communicated in various meetings the applicant is basing their business concept on this site on the Truck Yard in Dallas, Tex.,” said Maurice Postal, a county planner. “The concept is an outdoor food truck yard, beer garden and live entertainment venue, and restaurants are an allowed use in the highway commercial zoning.”

A site plan attached to the planning and zoning staff report on the project details expanded parking at the front and back of the property and the proposed layout of the yard in back, which would be covered in a layer of gravel.

The site plan also shows two spaces for food trucks, a bar, two outdoor seating areas and an outdoor stage and dance floor. It also includes an area for guests to walk their dogs.

The old Pumpkin Patch building will remain to serve as the entrance into the back yard and as part of the establishment’s bar.

Part-owner Tony Clark clarified the restaurant’s design. While the site plan showed the bar in a detached structure, he said the bar would actually start in the existing Pumpkin Patch building and spill over into a repurposed shipping container connected via a porch.

While food trucks will be the primary source of food, Clark said the bar will also serve food from its own menu.

Sharon Clark, the other owner, said the hours of operation would be 5 to 11 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

MPC member Gary Nevill asked about the noise level neighbors could expect from the business.

The music will be low-key, Sharon Clark said, not loud enough to cause a disturbance. She and Tony Clark envisioned it as a family-friendly place where people could relax and converse.

While it usually doesn’t allow public comment on site plans, the MPC voted unanimously to hold public hearings on all site plans on the agenda Tuesday.

Donald Hutcheson, a nearby resident, said he was concerned the business would worsen congestion in the area and with the establishment’s proximity to Remnant Church and to Christian Renewal Church.

“I know the folks have offered some legal reasons that they can build next to a church,” Hutcheson said. “I don’t like those legal reasons, I don’t think this venue should be right next door to a church where the property lines meet, particularly now that they say it’s going to operate on Sunday mornings.”

In addition, the food truck yard’s hours of operation will overlap with youth sports games hosted at Christian Renewal, he said, which should be a concern for the county.

Hutcheson added that around 15 other residents who lived nearby were opposed but did not attend the meeting because they did not think they would be able to speak.

Jamie Jackson, the pastor of Remnant Church, said the establishment’s hours of operation would run concurrently with their morning and evening services and youth programs.

“If there’s drinking involved, there’s probably intoxication involved, which doesn’t seem to really mix with small children less than 50 yards away,” Jackson said.

Tony Clark said he was raised as a Pentecostal Christian, so the idea of selling alcohol so close to a church didn’t sit well with him.

That said, most locally-owned restaurants in the county offer alcohol to some degree, he said, including the family-friendly ones.

Postal addressed the business’s proximity to the church.

“County ordinance does generally enforce a 600-foot buffer between retail establishments selling alcohol and a church,” Postal said. “But (county ordinance) section 2-3-16(g) waives that 600-foot buffer if the property where the church is located was in a commercial or industrial zone when members of the church began worshiping and if that property is still in a commercial or industrial zoning district at the time an application is filed for an alcohol license.”

While Remnant Church is located within the buffer, it has occupied a highway commercial zone since it opened, Postal said, meaning the 600-foot buffer requirement does not apply.

As for traffic, Chris Amos, agent for the owners, said the two exits sit right next to a traffic light. If traffic from the business does back up, it will back up into the parking lot and will not spill onto the street.

“That light will regulate it,” Amos said.

The MPC ultimately approved the site plan 4-3, commissioners Gene Lee, Richard Strickland and John Williams voting against it.

In other business, the commission voted to:

• Recommend the county commission approve an ordinance amendment dealing with the planning commissions’ officer election process.

• Recommend the county commission approve an amendment to the planning commissions’ bylaws.

• Approve a 1,500 square foot vehicle storage building on Bailey Road.

The MPC’s next meeting is scheduled for Aug. 6.