Omaha, NE: Couple Finds Suitable Business with Food Truck

Moises Salgado makes a breakfast burrito in the 5 Buck Lunch Truck. He makes all of the food, except for the tortillas, from scratch. Photo by Mike Bell

By Mike Bell | Omaha.com

Moises Salgado makes a breakfast burrito in the 5 Buck Lunch Truck. He makes all of the food, except for the tortillas, from scratch. Photo by Mike Bell

For the last seven weeks, Jacklyn and Moises Salgado have parked their 5 Buck Lunch Truck in the parking lot of O’Reilly Auto Parts in Bellevue.

Some diners take their food to go, others sit at tables in the shade of a canopy. The food, though fast, is all made from scratch, and includes recipes the husband and wife team collected during their travels in Mexico.

The pair used to own a Mexican restaurant in South Omaha, but when they bought a house in Bellevue, they decided to open a place of their own here. That restaurant, Antojitos, on Fort Crook Road North got to be more work than they wanted.

“It was a nice business, but it got too big for us,” Jacklyn said.

They sold the business and traveled to Mexico City for the winter, so Jacklyn could work on her cookbook and Moises could visit his family.

When they returned, Moises told Jacklyn that they should capitalize on the food truck craze.

“There was a barbecue truck down the road from here,” Moises said. That truck, owned by Swine Dining, is gone now because of its restaurant in Olde Towne.

So the Salgados bought a truck from Moises’ brother, who was using it to sell tamales in South Omaha. They repainted it, reworked the electricity and outfitted it with all of the necessary equipment.

The 5 Buck Lunch Truck was born, with Moises and Jacklyn’s smiling caricatures adorning the side. The truck is parked at O’Reilly, southwest of Harlan Drive and Galvin Road South. It is open Monday through Saturday from 6:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The lunch truck usually carries four or five different meal items a day, with a $5 special Jacklyn calls the “Fancy Special.” Not all of the items are Mexican food, like beer-steamed chicken with saffron rice and Thai chicken with coconut milk, fried curry and chipotle, referred to as Mexi-Thai by Jacklyn.

Their recipes come from Mexico City, and Moises said variety is a huge part of what they do.

“We don’t want people thinking Mexican food is just beans, chips and rice,” Moises said.

Spanish and French influences are part of the style of food in Mexico, he said.

Also, Jacklyn said they have the best breakfast burritos in town.

“Business has been good,” Moises said. “And it’s because we make everything fresh and in the moment.”

http://www.omaha.com/article/20120514/NEWS2001/705099837/1120